weareallmixedup:

poet Sarah Kay- half-Japanese, half-Jewish.

weareallmixedup:

poet Sarah Kay- half-Japanese, half-Jewish.

Anonymous said: The holocaust was 50 years ago and the Jews never bitch about it but slavery was 200 years ago and black people still use it as an excuse for their decline and criminality. Weird it's almost like they'd rather blame other people than take responsibility for themselves.

shitrichcollegekidssay:

May 8, 1945, when the war in Europe officially ended, which you know would make that 69 years ago, so you’re wrong about when the holocaust was, for starters, and it’s still taught in public schools, people who were in it still talk about it and it’s generally treated in western society as a travesty, and used as the worst possible case of something that can happen, hitler is constantly brought up and used as the epitome of evil, things that happened during the holocaust are constantly brought up and used as examples of pique war crimes, etc. 

December 6, 1865 was when slavery was abolished in the united states, which would have been 149 years ago, which is… not close to 200, which would again make your dates wrong, unsurprisingly since you can’t seem to get dates right at all as I’m assuming you don’t like to research things before you make claims, however, American Apartheid, AKA The “Separate but Equal” doctrine was eventually overturned by the U.S. Supreme Court in the case of Brown v. Board of Education in 1954, which would make that 60 years ago, which is 9 years closer to us than the holocaust. Which means, yes, lots of black americans are still alive today who lived through the american apartheid. 

I believe slavery in the world became entirely illegal in 2007, so that was 7 years ago, even you were likely around for that, human trafficking is an ongoing issue, more people are in slavery today than were in slavery in the 1860s, more people are in slavery in america today than were in slavery in the 1860s.

Redlining didn’t end until around the late 70s, but black communities still receive fewer loans than would make statistical reasonable sense today, so it’s still an ongoing problem affecting millions to this day, and the effects of redlining haven’t really been remedied. 

Public schools are funded based on property value, and due to redlining, black neighborhoods property values are lower than majority white neighborhoods, making their schools have less funding on average than majority white neighborhood schools.

I mean literally you can just fucking google all this and realize you’re wrong as hell and have no business spouting bullshit you can’t back up. I mean this shit is basic stuff you can fucking google, your dates are wrong, your time stamps are hella’ wrong, and I find it interesting that you place the holocaust nearer to our current time than in actuality, and you place slavery further from our current time than in actuality, gonna go ahead and correctly assume that’s just straight up racism going on.

This answer feels very icky to me and I can’t explain why- maybe someone can help after chag is over? ( littlegoythings nicejewishqueer @jumblr )

knittydelights:

Here it is all nice and dry…super squishy

knittydelights:

Here it is all nice and dry…super squishy

dkmissanya:


houseofalexzander:

Sending a big “FU” to the corporate side of the fashion industry.
As an increasingly successful fashion blogger, I have been targeted by several brands, large & small, one of which is quite a large corporation. Why? Because I am undermining a very important part of their money making system.
Today, the fashion industry is split in half. You have Women’s fashion & Men’s fashion. You will find designers here and there who produce androgynous designs but for the most part, the industry (brands & corporate companies) want designers who either design Men’s wear or Women’s wear, and follow a very gendered structure. Everything from the tailoring to the materials has to be specific to the binary boy/girl gender system.  This is why you can’t find feminine style’s of clothing tailored for the average males body type in any department store, thus creating a “mens” & “women’s” division.
Every time I modify the clothing I buy in department stores to fit my body type and then model it for people to see, not only am I inspiring people to step out of the box with their fashion choices, but I am merging two markets into one. Why is this bad for corporations?MONEY More markets equal more advertising and marketing opportunities which ultimately leads to more sales and more profit.
When I successfully inspire people to be less mindful about if they look like a girl or a boy, ultimately I am inspiring them to go against the gendered market system that brands and clothing companies make so much money off of.
I have received several hateful emails, discouraging my efforts as a fashion blogger. I was even asked by a large corporate clothing company to STOP buying their clothing and modifying it to fit my body type. They stated that by doing so, and sharing it with my audience that I was creating the illusion that gender did not exist, and that I am leading a bad example for society. …
A GENDERED SOCIETY CREATES A HUGE PROBLEM. IT DIVIDES PEOPLE.IT SEPERATES. IT CONTROLS. IT DISOLVES ANY & ALL ORIGINALITY.
FUCK YOU, to any clothing brand, company & corporation who’s got a problem with who I am, what I believe in & how I express myself.
-Elliott Alexzander

This is just so important! Gendered clothing is such bullshit and I want more people to realize!!!

dkmissanya:

houseofalexzander:

Sending a big “FU” to the corporate side of the fashion industry.

As an increasingly successful fashion blogger, I have been targeted by several brands, large & small, one of which is quite a large corporation.
Why?
Because I am undermining a very important part of their money making system.

Today, the fashion industry is split in half.
You have Women’s fashion & Men’s fashion.
You will find designers here and there who produce androgynous designs but for the most part, the industry (brands & corporate companies) want designers who either design Men’s wear or Women’s wear, and follow a very gendered structure. Everything from the tailoring to the materials has to be specific to the binary boy/girl gender system.
This is why you can’t find feminine style’s of clothing tailored for the average males body type in any department store, thus creating a “mens” & “women’s” division.

Every time I modify the clothing I buy in department stores to fit my body type and then model it for people to see, not only am I inspiring people to step out of the box with their fashion choices, but I am merging two markets into one.
Why is this bad for corporations?
MONEY
More markets equal more advertising and marketing opportunities which ultimately leads to more sales and more profit.

When I successfully inspire people to be less mindful about if they look like a girl or a boy, ultimately I am inspiring them to go against the gendered market system that brands and clothing companies make so much money off of.

I have received several hateful emails, discouraging my efforts as a fashion blogger. I was even asked by a large corporate clothing company to STOP buying their clothing and modifying it to fit my body type. They stated that by doing so, and sharing it with my audience that I was creating the illusion that gender did not exist, and that I am leading a bad example for society. …

A GENDERED SOCIETY CREATES A HUGE PROBLEM.
IT DIVIDES PEOPLE.

IT SEPERATES.
IT CONTROLS.
IT DISOLVES ANY & ALL ORIGINALITY.

FUCK YOU, to any clothing brand, company & corporation who’s got a problem with who I am, what I believe in & how I express myself.

-Elliott Alexzander

This is just so important! Gendered clothing is such bullshit and I want more people to realize!!!

(via yochevedke)

securelyinsecure:

Yvette Nicole Brown Responds to the NY Times’s portrayal of Shonda Rhimes as an “Angry Black Woman”

(via frightened)

shiraglassman:

Sweater in progress

Awesome!

shiraglassman:

Sweater in progress

Awesome!

Anonymous said: Why do jews have to tell everyone that theyre jews all the time chill smh

kosherqueer:

because otherwise someone might think I’m a goy

bpdlevi:

"you’re obsessed with your mental illness"

i know right? it’s almost like it impacts every part of my life

(via sebec)

herswagger:

When they were little!!!

(via showmedemkitties)

Anonymous said: I am a religious studies student, and I am not Jewish. Is there any appropriate way for me to observe/maybe even participate in Rosh- Ha-Shana and Yom Kippur?

nicejewishqueer:

angryjewishknitter:

nicejewishqueer:

laceydalby:

nicejewishqueer:

Do NOT do it in person, but I think if you googled “Rosh Hashanah livestream” and watched one, that would be okay. What do other people think?

I think it would be fine to attend RH services, if they are willing to really engage and be present, not just be there to say they were there. Our synagogue will give tickets to students with a student id, mostly for college kids away from home, but also for students like these. 

Now, if by “I am not Jewish” you, in any way, mean “I am not Jewish YET” go for it, ask for tickets and attend the whole thing. The year before my conversion (I was already attending weekly services) I had to ask for student tickets, got them, and attended everything. The services were very meaningful to me,and the experience is a well remembered part of my journey. That was 2001, so it has the additional emotional resonance of being just after 9/11, and helped me get through that time as well. 

Again, I do disagree with your first paragraph but I’m reblogging for anon to see your opinion.

I would get in touch with the student leaders of your local Hillel/ on-campus Jewish community and ask them if they have any thoughts on what would be appropriate for you to engage in. At my school, our Jewish center is aimed at Jewish students but (since it is such a small campus) open to everyone.

Different communities have different standards of acceptability, and talking with members before attending will also let you know the specific details on not standing out (dress, when to arrive, etc).

In terms of behavior, the most important thing to think about is what are your reasons for attending the service? Are you interested in converting? Then definitely go! Do you want to engage in a meaningful spiritual experience that complements or enriches your own beliefs? That’s probably fine. Do you just want to watch some weird rituals performed by a group of people you have nothing in common with? Then stay away, Jews don’t need a derisive or patronizing observer there on the High Holy Days.

"Do you want to engage in a meaningful spiritual experience that complements or enriches your own beliefs? That’s probably fine." I strongly disagree. Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur are not for worshiping Jesus. That is NOT okay by me.

That’s fair. I wasn’t considering that someone would be so blatant as to do that, I meant it in more of an agnostic/ “spiritual” basis. However, I do think that attending a synagogue service to respectfully worship G-d in a setting with your peers, even if you believe that Jesus is (part) of G-d is okay. But I have also only had Christians attend services who were very active in interfaith and/or faith-based social justice movements or close friends/ partners of Jewish community leaders, so my experience might differ.

Anonymous said: I am a religious studies student, and I am not Jewish. Is there any appropriate way for me to observe/maybe even participate in Rosh- Ha-Shana and Yom Kippur?

nicejewishqueer:

laceydalby:

nicejewishqueer:

Do NOT do it in person, but I think if you googled “Rosh Hashanah livestream” and watched one, that would be okay. What do other people think?

I think it would be fine to attend RH services, if they are willing to really engage and be present, not just be there to say they were there. Our synagogue will give tickets to students with a student id, mostly for college kids away from home, but also for students like these. 

Now, if by “I am not Jewish” you, in any way, mean “I am not Jewish YET” go for it, ask for tickets and attend the whole thing. The year before my conversion (I was already attending weekly services) I had to ask for student tickets, got them, and attended everything. The services were very meaningful to me,and the experience is a well remembered part of my journey. That was 2001, so it has the additional emotional resonance of being just after 9/11, and helped me get through that time as well. 

Again, I do disagree with your first paragraph but I’m reblogging for anon to see your opinion.

I would get in touch with the student leaders of your local Hillel/ on-campus Jewish community and ask them if they have any thoughts on what would be appropriate for you to engage in. At my school, our Jewish center is aimed at Jewish students but (since it is such a small campus) open to everyone.

Different communities have different standards of acceptability, and talking with members before attending will also let you know the specific details on not standing out (dress, when to arrive, etc).

In terms of behavior, the most important thing to think about is what are your reasons for attending the service? Are you interested in converting? Then definitely go! Do you want to engage in a meaningful spiritual experience that complements or enriches your own beliefs? That’s probably fine. Do you just want to watch some weird rituals performed by a group of people you have nothing in common with? Then stay away, Jews don’t need a derisive or patronizing observer there on the High Holy Days.

On a Rosh Hashanah which fell on Shabbos - R’ Levi Yitzchak of Berditchiv rose and said:

"Lord of the Universe, today You judge each person for the coming year, and grant him life or condemn him to death. But, on this Rosh Hashanah You are forced by Your own Torah to grant a good and healthy life to all Your people in coming year. After all, on Shabbos You have decreed in Your Holy Torah that it is prohibited to write. How then can You fulfil ‘On Rosh Hashanah it is written down’? There is no way for You to inscribe anyone in the Book of Death, because writing is forbidden. On the other hand, You may certainly inscribe us all in the Book of Life, because when there is pikuach nefesh (danger to life) the prohibition on writing does not apply."

x (via lo-yichbe-balaila-nera)

(via shomermitzvah)